“I’m moving to Canada”

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by Blacknwhite, Aug 10, 2018.

  1. Blacknwhite

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    #1 Blacknwhite, Aug 10, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2020
  2. Chuuriah_Carey

    Chuuriah_Carey Public Figure

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    Canadian resident here! If I could, I'd leave Canada tbh. I'd love to move to London.
     
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  3. Blacknwhite

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    Same London is beautiful
     
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  4. Vikki

    Vikki Married to @Girl_Crush
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    You know what was great? When gay marriage was leagalized in America and a bunch of people on social media said they would move to Canada.
     
  5. Chuuriah_Carey

    Chuuriah_Carey Public Figure

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    Yaaay. London gets so much hate and has quite a bad reputation but tbh it's a huge city (larger than some countries) so I don't even expect it to be perfect.
     
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  6. Blacknwhite

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    Gay marriage was legalized in 2006 here tho LOL
     
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  7. Panda

    Panda Married to @LuhansGreenHair
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    I know that a lot of people were just talking about it as a joke (at least, I have been), but wow, I didn't know it was that horrible over there xD
    Good thing that I don't plan out on moving anywhere outside of the States ^^'
     
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  8. Blacknwhite

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    Lol no people have actually come here like thousands, and they costed the government like $200 million just for all of their costs...
     
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  9. Vikki

    Vikki Married to @Girl_Crush
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    Exactly why it was so funny :teeheek:
     
  10. Noemi

    Noemi Guest

    My opinion is so different. Let's start with healthcare. A lot of stuff is actually free under the healthcare. Surgeries are paid for? Where? Dude, I have had surgeries done and they didn't cost me anything. Yes, there is still a lot of shit that isn't free like prescription (though the new law does make them free for children under 25 who aren't covered under their parent's plan and over 65, most prescriptions are free), dentist, optometrist and certain surgeries BUT that's where your work health benefits takes over. I pay about $10 per paycheck for my benefit plan and I pay for nothing. So if you tell me that's a hardship, I will gladly live it. And yes, our taxes are higher because the taxes we pay in part support the benefits we receive from provincial and federal government. If you don't want all those child benefits, EI, single parent grants, welfare, health care etc. along with nice roads and all the benefits of a first world country, then yes complain about them taxes.

    Safety. Yes, we have seen higher crime in Canada this year and it's a sad thing. I am not going to offer an excuse for that. I really hope that we can get it back under control.

    Housing, it's dependent on where you live. Some of the major cities are of course expensive and that's a natural thing. Even US has cities where real estate is as expensive as gold.

    Now, our economy. Don't compare us to the US. We are a economy of only $35 million and our stock markets overall stay flat. Also, I don't know where your information is from but Canadian economy actually has been doing better than expected amid the NAFTA uncertainty. Our GDP expanded by 3% in 2017 and is on track to expand by 2.2% in 2018. According to the jobs data that got released today, our unemployment rate fell from 6% to 5.8% and about 54,000 jobs were added in July. Our retail numbers were better and overall, despite everything that's going on, the economy is doing okay. It would definitely be doing much better if NAFTA was wrapped up and no trade wars were being initiated; both US and Canadian markets would have been seeing double digit gains but hey let's not open up that topic. I could go on and on about that.
    If you want to keep a close eye on the economy, you can follow live updates at: https://www.baystreet.ca/

    Finally, between US and Canada, I don't think one is better than the other. Both have their own positives and negatives and honestly, you are welcome to live in the country you like better.
     
    #10 Noemi, Aug 10, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 10, 2018
  11. Blacknwhite

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    In May and June it stayed 0.5% and it was even lower in the beginning of the year. Those jobs added in July were only because of a short spurt caused by the oil industry. Yes it grew 3% in 2017 fastest rate in 6 years but fell back down because it simply wasn’t sustainable.

    As for healthcare, lots of operations are not free and if they are there’s usually a long waiting list. Most employers don’t give health benefits and most of those things really only come with government jobs or jobs from huge corporations. As for housing yes it is the big cities that are expensive...however unlike the U.S most of our population 80% live in either Alberta,Ontario,BC and Quebec all provinces known for their real estate bubbles so those major cities are where everyone lives.
     
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  12. Spinereader

    Spinereader Leader

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    To be fair, this describes pretty much every world leader, even the better ones.

    Canada is a decent country, but I've heard it's very hard to become a citizen. And there is SO much snow! As a lifelong southerner, driving in heavy snow just terrifies me.
     
  13. Blacknwhite

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    I guess so, our immigration system is a lot more difficult than people think and ur right abt the snow haha. But after a while it becomes something you enjoy
     
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  14. Noemi

    Noemi Guest

    Um no. It's the public sector that added most jobs and those were in health care and social assistance. The reasons for the fall in GDP are many but most of it is related to NAFTA uncertainty and the trade tensions.

    There is long wait list because everyone can get surgery and there aren't enough surgeons available. Hence, they prioritize. Under OHIP, only the following aren't covered (this is from the government website):
    • prescription drugs provided in non-hospital settings (e.g. antibiotics prescribed by your family doctor)
    • dental services provided in a dentist’s office
    • eyeglasses, contact lenses
    • laser eye surgery
    • cosmetic surgery
    The rest is covered. From personal experience, there are some medical tests that aren't covered by OHIP but they are covered by the work benefit plan. Most jobs actually give the option to take the health benefit plan but the employee has the right to opt out. Only if you are a casual worker or work for cash, you won't be covered. Of course, it depends which company you work for because some offer better plans than others. Finally, insurance companies offer plans as well if your work doesn't, the ones that cover the most basic stuff (not the massages and stuff) are affordable.
    The exorbitant prices are mostly in Toronto, Vancouver and I am not sure about Montreal, I don't have any relative there so I can't say. Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg and other cities are moderately priced.
     
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  15. Blacknwhite

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    #15 Blacknwhite, Aug 10, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2020
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  16. Noemi

    Noemi Guest

    You information is wrong Koko. I can link you to news sites that list 90,000+ jobs added by health care and social assistance. We lost jobs in manufacturing, about 36,500 I think. The pipeline, I am guessing you are talking about TransMountain?, had no reported affect on jobs.
    Source: https://www.ctvnews.ca/business/canada-adds-54-100-jobs-in-july-unemployment-rate-falls-1.4047570

    Other provinces have their own health programs since it's a provincial thing, not federal. Of course, you can fly to US or other countries and get the surgery. That's not what healthcare is about. Healthcare won't be privatized because basic healtcare should be everyone's right. Not everyone can afford to pay for medical treatment and if you privatize it, it will be hard for a lot of people, not unlike the crisis we see in US regarding health care.

    What Tim Horton employees lost were the extra benefits Tims gave them that are not required by ESA, like paid breaks and additional benefits that are dependent on their length of service. Many companies provide benefits that far exceed the standard set by ESA and if they take those away to meet the bottom line; it's a sad thing but also understandable. For example, a friend of mine works at TD and as a benefit she gets much lower lending rates and higher interest rates.

    Also, can I just say that I would love to continue to chat but it's 10:23pm and I had a hectic work week. My mind is bound to shut down soon and I am not looking to keep typing this much. I didn't think my comment would start such a discussion. In ways your opinion isn't wrong, Canada isn't a perfect country people make it out to be. We have our fuck ups and everything but so does every other country in the world. Getting a job in US is easy for me (I am not boasting. I literally work at a company with headquarters in US and I have been asked if I would like to work there.) but I choose not to because the country isn't for me. However, a friend of mine gladly left Canada for US because the pay is higher. I think it boils down to personal preference and mine is Canada.
     
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  17. takit

    takit Trendsetter

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    Yeah! Great, well said.
     
    #17 takit, Aug 10, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018
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  18. ListenToBadMusic

    ListenToBadMusic Trendsetter

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    I can only live in major cities. It'd take a lot for me to leave NYC even if you need to be above average income-wise to live comfortably here.
     
  19. Blacknwhite

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    #19 Blacknwhite, Aug 10, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2020
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  20. Noemi

    Noemi Guest

    Those jobs were basically reduced to 0 with the loss in the same sector. Actually, there was a net loss in construction jobs. The positive comes from health and social assistance.

    Your contribution to healthcare is dependent on your taxable income. If you are in the lowest bracket, you pay $15-$20 and the highest you ever pay is $900 for the year to get all that. And to pay $900, you must be making over 200,000. It's not a major part of your income.

    You do know US has a massive debt? As in trillions of dollars. Of course, US is a bigger economy and there's a safety in that. It's a personal preference. However, Canada's economy isn't that fragile. Remember the 2008 crash? Our economy was much more stable in that period as compared to US. Though no one can deny, Canada needs to diversify. We are rich in natural resources, it's our strength and we use it but there are other industries in Canada. We will chat about them some other time. We need to however reduce our dependency on states.

    Okay, I will shut up now. I hope you are able to move to US. There are benefits to that as well.
     
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